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Unit 12. Work



LISTENING WARM-UP
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DEVELOP YOUR LISTENING SKILLS
Listening know-how LISTENING FOR GIST
Информация, интересующая вас, не всегда бывает четко выражена в тексте. Иногда приходится догадываться о том, что осталось невысказанным, исходя из содержания текста. Например, говорящий может не сказать I am a teacher, но это понятно из слов, которые он употребляет в разговоре: classroom, students, homework.
 
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You are going to listen to six people describing a typical day at work. Before you listen, write down some key words you might expect to hear for each job.
Key.Suggested answers:
a:music, studio, record, play, talk
b:camera, stadium, take pictures, action, match, sell, newspaper/magazine
c: court, case, trial, criminal, witness, prison, guilty
d: till, receipt, bag, change, credit card, shelves
e: school, students, classroom, desk, board, homework
f: drive, route, bus stop, passengers, tickets

radio DJ _________________________________________
_________________________________________________
sports photographer ______________________________
_________________________________________________
judge ___________________________________________
_________________________________________________
shop assistant ___________________________________
_________________________________________________
teacher _________________________________________
_________________________________________________
bus driver _______________________________________
_________________________________________________


flag.jpgNow listen to the extracts. Match each speaker with a job from Exercise A.
Key.Speaker 1: f 
Speaker 2: b 
Speaker 3: e
Speaker 4: d 
Speaker 5: с 
Speaker 6: a
 
Speaker 1:   _________________________________    
Speaker 2:   _________________________________            
Speaker 3:   _________________________________    
Speaker 4:   _________________________________    
Speaker 5:   _________________________________    
Speaker 6:   _________________________________    

Tapescript

Speaker 1


This week, it's from the railway station to the town centre and back again. I actually really enjoy it, although it's a bit annoying when you get stuck in traffic and all the passengers start blaming you.

Speaker 2


You know, one day you're in London for a cricket match or something, the next you're going halfway round the world for the Olympics, then a few weeks later it's a football match in Swindon.

Speaker 3


I'm actually in the classroom for about twenty-four hours a week, but of course there's also a lot of lesson preparation and marking to do, so it's a tiring job.

Speaker 4


I spend most of the day saying things like: 'Can I help you?', 'That's three pounds fifty, please.', 'Here's your receipt.' and 'Shall I put that in a bag for you?'.

Speaker 5


You therefore have to listen to the evidence very carefully before reaching your verdict, your decision. I do have to send people to prison sometimes, of course, so it's a huge responsibility.

Speaker 6


You've got to make it fun, to put people in a good mood, but also give them the news, weather and traffic information that they need first thing. Of course you've got to play lots of good music too.


flag.jpgListen to longer extracts of the peoples descriptions and circle True or False. Be careful! The extracts are in a different order this time.
Key.Speaker 1: 1F, 2T
Speaker 2: 1T, 2T
Speaker 3: 1T, 2T
Speaker 4: 1T, 2F
Speaker 5: 1F, 2T
Speaker 6: 1F, 2T

       Speaker 1
1    He really enjoys his job.    T / F
2    His working day is long.    T / F
       Speaker 2
1    People sometimes get angry with her.    T / F
2    The job has become easier.     T / F
        Speaker 3       
1    He enjoys his job.    T / F   
2    He sometimes has to hide his feelings.    T / F   
        Speaker 4        
1    She enjoys the travelling.   T / F
2    She works for one newspaper all the time.    T / F
       Speaker 5   
1    He is bored of his job.    T / F
2    He likes most of his students.    T / F
     Speaker 6 
1    She feels that every day at work is the same.    T / F
2    She has to be very careful in her job.    T / F

Tapescript

Speaker 1


Well, yes, you do get to meet a lot of different people, but you don't exactly have interesting conversations with them. I spend most of the day saying things like: 'Can I help you?', 'That's three pounds fifty, please.', 'Here's your receipt.' and 'Shall I put that in a bag for you?'. It's not the most interesting job in the world, I can tell you. I get there at about half past seven in the morning, and the first customers are waiting to come in when we open the doors at eight. I suppose I do do a few different things at work: I work on the till, I help customers choose the right things, and I deal with complaints if any of our products don't work properly. It's a long day though - I don't get home until seven at night usually, and I have to work on Saturdays.

Speaker 2


I do the same route every day for a week, and then we change. This week, it's from the railway station to the town centre and back again. I actually really enjoy it, although it's a bit annoying when you get stuck in traffic and all the passengers start blaming you. I mean, there's nothing I can do about that, is there? It used to be more difficult, because, as well as driving, we also had to sell tickets when people got on. These days, though, they buy tickets from a newsagent's or wherever and just punch them in a machine when they get on, so we don't have to worry about giving the right change, or anything like that.

Speaker 3


Well, I do the weekday breakfast show, which means getting up at half past four in the morning to get to the studio for six. Then I'm on air until ten. It's a great show to do, as you know you're the first thing that millions of people hear when they wake up in the morning. You've got to make it fun, to put people in a good mood, but also give them the news, weather and traffic information that they need first thing. Of course you've got to play lots of good music too. You're definitely not allowed to sound tired, or in a bad mood! That's perhaps the most difficult thing: you've always got to sound so happy!

Speaker 4


For me, it's the best job in the world! I can't imagine doing anything else. You're in a different place every day. You know, one day you're in London for a cricket match or something, the next you're going halfway round the world for the Olympics, then a few weeks later it's a football match in Swindon. I'm self-employed, so my work really starts after I've taken the pictures. I rush back to the dark room, develop the photos, and then send them to newspapers and magazines to see who wants to buy them. It's such a great feeling when you see a picture you took in the paper the next day!

Speaker 5


I'm actually in the classroom for about twenty-four hours a week, but of course there's also a lot of lesson preparation and marking to do, so it's a tiring job. The students make it all worthwhile, though. It's wonderful watching them learn, and feeling you're helping to educate them. Some kids do cause trouble, or are rude, or just lazy, but most of them are really kind, polite, bright, interesting and interested youngsters. I think they're going to be great adults when they're older.

Speaker 6


I have a little office behind my courtroom where I go when we're not actually having a trial. I usually work from about eight in the morning till five or six at night. What I particularly like about this job is that each case is different. You may have the same crime again and again, but each actual case and, of course, each defendant, is different. You therefore have to listen to the evidence very carefully before reaching your verdict, your decision. I do have to send people to prison sometimes, of course, so it's a huge responsibility.




PRACTISE YOUR
LISTENING SKILLS


flag.jpgListen to the same six people talking about their skills and experience. Circle the statement, A or B, which is true for each speaker.
Key. Speaker 1: A
Speaker 2: A
Speaker 3: В
Speaker 4: В
Speaker 5: В
Speaker 6: В

Speaker 1
A   Skills are more important than qualifications.
В   Qualifications and skills are equally important.
Speaker 2
A   The right qualification is the most important thing.
В   The right skill is the most important thing.
Speaker 3
A   A combination of qualifications, skills and luck is important.
В   A combination of experience, skills and luck is important.
Speaker 4
A   Qualifications are extremely important.
В   Qualifications can sometimes be useful.
Speaker 5
A   Qualifications are useful, but not very important.
В   Qualifications are very important.
Speaker 6
A   It is easy to get this job.
B   It is difficult to get this job.

Tapescript

Speaker 1


Well, you don't need a degree or anything like that for this job, I can tell you. I mean, really, you actually don't need any qualifications at all. Skills are a different matter, though. You've got to be good at dealing with people, always be polite and friendly, never get annoyed, that sort of thing. You've also got to look clean and smart and generally just be a helpful person, I suppose.

Speaker 2


The most important thing is that you have a licence to drive a public bus. However good at driving you are, if you don't have the licence, you won't get the job. And you get the licence by taking a driving test, but it's a little bit more difficult than the test for driving a car. I personally think you have to be polite and friendly, although I do know a few other bus drivers who wouldn't agree! What else? You used to have to be quite good at maths, because, as I said, we had to give change, but you don't really need that any more.

Speaker 3


Qualifications? None. You can leave school with nothing at the age of sixteen and still become a DJ. That's the beauty of it! To get a show like mine on national radio, you need to have lots and lots of experience, probably starting in local radio. You've got to have a good, clear, friendly voice, and, of course, to love music. And you've got to have a lot of luck! How you look doesn't make any difference, thank goodness! That's what I love about the radio!

Speaker 4


Well, I suppose it helps if you've studied photography at university or college, but I do know some great photographers who've never really studied it. It's more important that you've got a very good sense of what makes a good picture - and that comes really from experience. It's also a natural talent, though, I think. Some people will never make good photographers, however much they study or practise. For my job, you've also got to love travelling and, because I run my own business, you've got be organized and quite good at maths.

Speaker 5


Yes, you've got to have a university degree, and also a teaching qualification. You see, it's not just about how much you know about the subject - it's also how well you can teach it to other people. They're actually quite different things. You've got to like children, of course, and you've got to be enthusiastic. If you're not enthusiastic, then the kids are just going to get bored, aren't they? You've also got to be happy not earning a lot of money!

Speaker 6


Yes, well, you can't really become a judge without having been a lawyer for a long time beforehand. And to become a lawyer, you really need to do a law degree at university. So, yes, there's a lot of work to do before you can become a judge. I think you have to be very logical and analytical, and, of course, fair. You've got to have very good listening skills, too.


flag.jpgListen again and match each speaker with a statement.
Key.
Speaker 1: f 
Speaker 2: с 
Speaker 3: e
Speaker 4: d 
Speaker 5: a 
Speaker 6: b

Speaker 1: ______________ 
Speaker 2: ______________     
Speaker 3: ______________     
Speaker 4: ______________     
Speaker 5: ______________     
Speaker 6: ______________   

b
с
d
e
f
Your mood can affect other people.
You have to be good at thinking clearly.
This skill is not so important now.
Not everyone can learn to do this job well.
Your appearance is not important.
You should never become angry.
Tapescript

Speaker 1


Well, you don't need a degree or anything like that for this job, I can tell you. I mean, really, you actually don't need any qualifications at all. Skills are a different matter, though. You've got to be good at dealing with people, always be polite and friendly, never get annoyed, that sort of thing. You've also got to look clean and smart and generally just be a helpful person, I suppose.

Speaker 2


The most important thing is that you have a licence to drive a public bus. However good at driving you are, if you don't have the licence, you won't get the job. And you get the licence by taking a driving test, but it's a little bit more difficult than the test for driving a car. I personally think you have to be polite and friendly, although I do know a few other bus drivers who wouldn't agree! What else? You used to have to be quite good at maths, because, as I said, we had to give change, but you don't really need that any more.

Speaker 3


Qualifications? None. You can leave school with nothing at the age of sixteen and still become a DJ. That's the beauty of it! To get a show like mine on national radio, you need to have lots and lots of experience, probably starting in local radio. You've got to have a good, clear, friendly voice, and, of course, to love music. And you've got to have a lot of luck! How you look doesn't make any difference, thank goodness! That's what I love about the radio!

Speaker 4


Well, I suppose it helps if you've studied photography at university or college, but I do know some great photographers who've never really studied it. It's more important that you've got a very good sense of what makes a good picture - and that comes really from experience. It's also a natural talent, though, I think. Some people will never make good photographers, however much they study or practise. For my job, you've also got to love travelling and, because I run my own business, you've got be organized and quite good at maths.

Speaker 5


Yes, you've got to have a university degree, and also a teaching qualification. You see, it's not just about how much you know about the subject - it's also how well you can teach it to other people. They're actually quite different things. You've got to like children, of course, and you've got to be enthusiastic. If you're not enthusiastic, then the kids are just going to get bored, aren't they? You've also got to be happy not earning a lot of money!

Speaker 6


Yes, well, you can't really become a judge without having been a lawyer for a long time beforehand. And to become a lawyer, you really need to do a law degree at university. So, yes, there's a lot of work to do before you can become a judge. I think you have to be very logical and analytical, and, of course, fair. You've got to have very good listening skills, too.

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As a class, discuss these statements. Give reasons for your opinions.
I know exactly what I want to do when I grow up.
It's more important to hane a job you enjoy than a well-paid job.
People with university degrees get better jobs.


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